Home Forums Share an Effective Practice Contact-Hour Replacement: How to avoid becoming a correspondence course?

This topic contains 2 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Joseph S. Clark 8 months ago.

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  • #2249

    Joseph S. Clark
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    Recently our university curriculum committee approached us for suggestions to faculty seeking approval for course delivery in the online mode. They were frustrated with an increasing number of syllabus submissions that seemed to be limited to viewing lecture recordings and taking multiple-choice exams. This isn’t an isolated problem, as the recent US DOE audit at Western Governors has shown.

    Of course, holding synchronous, live class sessions via webinar or requiring participation in asynchronous online discussion forums have typically been the go-to strategies for contact hour replacement, but there are plenty of other options. We’d like to create a simple checklist for faculty guidance, not only listing acceptable ways to replace contact hours but helping to sell these strategies as student-centric, effective, and in conformance with quality standards. The majority of our online courses are asynchronous.

    This got me wondering if anyone in the TOPkit community knew of a similar resource we could use as a model. Your suggestions appreciated!

    (I’ve attached a summary document with links to the WGU audit and a few positive/negative examples.)

    Cheers,
    Joe

    Joseph S. Clark, PhD
    Associate Director, Instructional Development
    Office of Distance Learning
    Florida State University
    myweb.fsu.edu/joe

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  • #2254

    Charlotte Jones-Roberts
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    Hi Joe,

    Have you checked out SUNY’s opensource rubric OSCQR? http://oscqr.org/ I think some of it may be a great fit for what you’re looking for— especially the ‘Content & Activities’ and ‘Interaction’ sections.

    The scorecard is pretty thorough: https://onlinelearningconsortium.org/consult/oscqr-course-design-review/

    Plus, OSCQR has not only a rubric/scorecard but also a thorough explanation of each Standard *and* ideas/resources for how faculty may want to implement. This is a great example: http://oscqr.org/standard29/

    It’s definitely worth looking into! (I’m a big fan, if you can’t tell, haha!)

    Charlotte

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    • #2274

      Joseph S. Clark
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      Thanks, Charlotte! The interaction section is particularly appropriate, as with QM. I’ll take a closer look.

      Joe

      Joseph S. Clark, PhD
      Associate Director, Instructional Development
      Office of Distance Learning
      Florida State University
      myweb.fsu.edu/joe

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