Home Forums Topical Discussions Seeing Student Work for Online Math & Science Tests

This topic contains 1 reply, has 2 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Amanda Major Amanda Major 2 months, 2 weeks ago.

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  • #1706
    Profile photo of V. Pope
    V. Pope
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    Does anyone have a solution so faculty can see their students’ work on individual problems during proctored online math or science tests? We are currently using ProctorU for our online tests, however, our math and science faculty want to review how students arrived at their answers.

  • #1708
    Profile photo of Amanda Major
    Amanda Major
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    I have encountered a similar request from a faculty member interested in viewing his students’ work on construction management (CM) math problems during proctored examinations with ProctorU. We derived a few of options. The CM faculty member could require that students complete their work electronically on an Excel, Word, or Paint document (or, even, a whiteboard recording) to submit as an assignment on the LMS during the quiz. Or, the faculty could require students to hand write their problem-solving process and scan that document onto their computer to upload as an assignment into the LMS during the proctored quiz-taking period.

    Because the CM faculty member was additionally concerned that students would engage in academic dishonesty by circulating their problem-solving work to other students, we needed to add a step in the proctoring process to discard students’ work. If a student saved his or her work documents electronically, through remote sharing a ProctorU proctor would delete all work documents from a student’s computer. If a student solved problems on paper and scanned, a student would be required to shred the work paper in front of his or her proctor and discard. Additionally, a proctor would also need to delete the saved file from that student’s computer.

    I hope this helps. I would be very interested in hearing other’s ideas about methods enabling faculty to review how students’ arrived at their answers.

    Amanda

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