Self-Care During the Pandemic

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    • #5113
      Tina Calandrino
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      Juggling the multiple hats we all wear blurs the lines when working from home. We are so busy getting that next cup of coffee to keep us going that we often fail to see that our cup is only half full, and no amount of caffeine will fix our issues. From noon Yoga session from a colleague to using one of the many apps out there that will remind you to stand up and stretch, help us make the most of #SelfCareSeptember by sharing your best secret for staying centered. To help us along the path, the CCSO Association created a video this past May from various 2020 Teachers of Year (YouTube: https://youtu.be/n3pdoe1hfuE). Though these tips are from classroom teachers, their messages are exactly what we all need to hear about self-care during our current Covid-19 crisis.

      Do not take self-care to mean self-indulgence. This is about taking action for the most important person in the world to you—YOU! The Ozobot Blog also has a well-researched article on How Educators Can Practice Self-Care. As the Dali Lama said, ” “If you feel “burnout” setting in, if you feel demoralized and exhausted, it is best, for the sake of everyone, to withdraw and restore yourself.”

      Follow the #SelfCareSeptember for more tips and tricks to well-being at the ActionforHappiness.org website.

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    • #5133
      Nancy Keefer
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      I so agree! Even when we’re working in an office, I have a hard time stepping away from my desk for lunch, which is considered a big element of self-care. The reason is simple and complex at the same time: I am an introvert with a mild case ADHD.

      The introvert means I don’t “relax” around a lot of loud people, talking in restaurants or cafeterias. If anything, that causes a negative impact on my afternoon. Additionally, eating at my desk and then going on errands with a friend is also not relaxing to me one bit.

      The ADHD means that if I’m on a roll, the last thing I can afford is to lose that focus because it’s NOON! Time to eat!

      Gah.

      So I’ve come to learn that for me, in the office self-care means being assertive and saying, “No thanks. I’m not taking lunch right now because the quiet is working well for me today.”

      While working from home, I set up my desk so I can see my back yard. My yard is my self-care. I have been able to remain focused on projects I have going on out there. I want to finish them, and they call me away from my desk as soon as I can – especially as the days get shorter, so my after dinner time out there is limited.

      Sadly, in Florida that’s also most likely to be the only time we can stay out without melting into a puddle of humidity!

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      • #5203
        Tina Calandrino
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        Nancy,

        I am so glad that you are putting up clear signals of work and relaxation in order to self-care! It is that multi-balls in the air that can take such a toll on us! I also look outside, beyond my computer, but to engage in seeing people on walks, bike rides, enjoying daily life so that I don’t feel so socially isolated during this time.

        My biggest issue is working through lunches or after hours, thinking that I need to be available at all times! Keeping a set schedule really has helped me in the past few months allocate projects better–and be better to my body by having a healthy lunch prepared or dinner simmering in the slow-cooker. It helps me to be aware of deadlines more if I actually take 30 minutes to read and eat, and then refocus my attention.

        Hoping to see how your self-care continues in the coming months! Tina

    • #5134
      Kristen Grissom
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      We’re all over-worked and under-paid right now; taking time for self-care is so important. Sometimes it means saying “no” (which I think we’re terrible at doing as educators) and setting firm boundaries on all the things that threaten time outside of work. Our jobs truly never end unless we budget time away each day.

      Thanks for this!

    • #5135
      Shelly Wyatt
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      You are so right, Tina! For me, though, it seems like what I need for self-care varies from week-to-week or even day-to-day. Another factor is what kinds of care I need to provide my family. One of the main ways I have engaged in self-care has been making sure I have time to cook (which is easier working from home).

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