This topic contains 14 replies, has 10 voices, and was last updated by  Amanda Major 1 year, 7 months ago.

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  • #996

    Ashley Salter
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    Some institutions issue guidance or examples to faculty members about providing videos, documents, activities, and assessments for students who may have accessibility needs in the online modality. What mechanisms are in place to encourage faculty members to create accessible online course materials at your institution?

    Ashley Salter
    University of Central Florida

  • #1260

    Dale Drees
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    The biggest movement I am seeing on our campus is the commitment towards making everything accessible. Recently I did a presentation on closed captioning. Attached is the presentation

    [attachment file=1261]

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    • #1264

      Tina Calandrino
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      Thanks for being the first from our Championship Table #6 to post! Have to agree that full accessibility is a big push in the online community. I appreciate the link and can’t wait to share it with my faculty!

    • #1280

      Kim Manning
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      Hi Dale,

      Thanks for the great resource! I will incorporate some of your ideas into our current workshop on making videos accessible.

      Kim

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    • #1291

      Amy Stuart
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      Thank you for sharing this presentation! We are working hard to get everything captioned for our faculty. Accessibility is a big concern for us; we have a very active faculty community using video recording for their courses.

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  • #1289

    Bill Harrison
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    We have moved away from using the term accessibility. We refer to this as universal design. We have a Universal Design Committee consisting of faculty, instructional designers, and technical experts. This committee has created a Universal Design Guide that we provide to faculty.

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  • #1395

    Dale Drees
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    Quickly turn YouTube’s automatic captions into accurate and professional captions for your YouTube videos.
    http://www.diycaptions.com/

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  • #1396

    Dale Drees
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    Here is the 6-week Accessibility course that Sun New York built that they have given permission to use.It can be found in the Canvas Commons or on the Free Canvas Network – Called: Accessibility: Designing and Teaching Courses for All Learners

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  • #1539

    Jennifer Smith
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    As we face the challenges involved with bringing our documents up to ADA “snuff,” we came across SensusAccess (sensusaccess.com). This is a self-service web-based document conversion service.

    It can convert documents to different file types, including creating audio files from text.
    It can do the OCR for images.
    It will also create flowable ePub docs.

    It should be noted that this service isn’t completely magic–it can’t describe an image and add the alt text. It also can’t identify headings. But it CAN do quite a bit that will be helpful as we work to bring our materials up to speed. We’ll be implementing this service campus-wide as soon as we can.

    The service is very reasonably priced. I understand that FAU uses their services. Can anyone from FAU tell us how the usage on their campus is going?

    Jennifer Smith

  • #1612

    Michelle Tuten
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    What mechanisms are in place to encourage faculty members to create accessible online course materials at your institution?

    We are in the process of switching to the Canvas by Instructure LMS and while faculty are adopting the associated changes, we’ve added UCF’s UDOIT accessibility auditing tool to our Canvas instance. Additionally, I created a detailed user manual for UDOIT that faculty can use to mediate accessibility issues and prepare for UDOIT scans. (This manual is available in Canvas Commons under a BY-NC-SA Creative Commons License.)

    Currently, we aren’t requiring that courses undergo UDOIT scans. We’ve found (not surprisingly) that if we tell faculty that something is required, we get a lot of pushback. If we instead package accessibility as a best practice and try to demonstrate the immediate or near immediate benefits that accessibility has for those without disabilities, and if we provide faculty instructions and assistance in addressing accessibility issues, faculty tend to be more open to the idea of developing while conforming to accessibility standards. Since UDOIT was only launched at our institution last week, I can’t say much about who has incorporated UDOIT in their development process and whether or not it is trending, but as the folks who are helping with the transfer get asked about UDOIT rather frequently, we have hope for it.

    In addition to implementing UDOIT, we have a certification process for online courses that we call ENCORE. ENCORE is a two-part, dialogic evaluation process as described on the Clemson Online website. The first half of this evaluation process includes standards from WCAG and Section 508 (pre-refresh), and we only let courses through to the next level if they can meet the non-accessibility standards and 11 of the 15 accessibility standards. The four standards that we allow courses to not meet are those which would require more assistance from our department than we can currently provide (captioning, document accessibility, web resource accessibility, and transcribing). While this certification is not yet required prior to teaching an online course, we do incentivize the certification process a bit further by providing instructional designers to those who request to go through the certification process.

    One last way that we try to encourage faculty to develop accessible courses is that we try to address the captioning concerns. Until this past summer, we had a small team of GAs who did their best to put a dent in the overwhelming demand for captions, but now we have contracts with two captioning services that should help meet our needs once we finish getting the accounts set up and the tools integrated. Once these tools are up and running, courses will need to complete the captioning requirement (and in most cases the transcribing requirement) in order to move to the next level.

    Hope this helps.

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    • #1614

      Jennifer Smith
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      Hi Michelle,
      Thanks for sharing your UDoit guide. Your plan for a 2-part evaluation process sounds like a good idea!

      Jennifer Smith

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  • #1616

    Michelle Tuten
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    There is a similar conversation taking place in Canvas Commons, if anyone is interested.
    ADA Compliance within Canvas Courses.

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  • #1631

    Rebecca Yost
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    What mechanisms are in place to encourage faculty members to create accessible online course materials at your institution?

    At FSW we are planning to implement UDOIT as soon as possible, but we also had several face-to-face professional development sessions about accessibility to bring home to our faculty and staff who upload to the web how important it is for all of our web presence to be ADA compliant, and follow-up workshops on how to upload accessible documents to the web in all places. We have an institutional task force that plans these sessions and monitors institutional ADA compliance.

    But aside from only focusing on ADA and the legal implications of non-compliance, part of our training for the FYE course includes a session on Universal Design – close to 400 of our faculty and staff have taken this session in the last five years.

    This is great – the awareness seems to be there for our faculty and staff, luckily. I know this because at the last online teaching institute we held, a question about accessibility came up during a faculty member’s showcase of her online Art History students and how they create an interactive “museum” using PowerPoint.

    One question came up that I’d like to pose to this group: What if a student submits inaccessible work for peer review? How do you handle the accessibility of student work in general? Do you have an institutional policy on it? Do you eliminate the assignment for all students? Or is it enough to design the assignments with Universal Design and alternative assignments in mind and make additional accommodations as specific cases require it?

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  • #1639

    Michelle Tuten
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    One question came up that I’d like to pose to this group: What if a student submits inaccessible work for peer review? How do you handle the accessibility of student work in general? Do you have an institutional policy on it? Do you eliminate the assignment for all students? Or is it enough to design the assignments with Universal Design and alternative assignments in mind and make additional accommodations as specific cases require it?

    I have had similar questions.

    Because my department doesn’t yet have quite enough authority to require faculty to develop accessible online courses, I’ve even wondered if informing the students about accessible practices would encourage the faculty to get on board…

    Unfortunately, I haven’t yet attempted to follow through on this train of thought, so I don’t really have any answers for you. :/

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    • #1643

      Amanda Major
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      Your question about students submitting inaccessible group work and how to prevent it is definitely worth considering. I would suggest describing in the instructions of the assignment that a student could submit their group work in a format accessible to all students and provide some instructions about how to achieve that format, for instance, by embedding video instructions about how to caption YouTube videos.

      If there is a student with accessibility needs in the course, then those needs must be addressed. Having available optional, comparable assignments (in congruence with Universal Design for Learning principles) could also help assuage the situation.

      I invite other’s responses and insights into these pressing concerns: students in groups submitting inaccessible work, policies/requirements about accessibility for courses, or encouraging faculty to create more accessible courses.

      Amanda

      Amanda

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