The Road to Instructional Designer Credibility (Issue 19)

Credibility road sign

Dear ADDIE,

I am new to the instructional design profession. I got this job–which I love–because I taught online, used flipped classroom strategies, and redesigned my course several times—not because I have any training or education in this field. I also did not have the support I needed with my first supervisor (who has since left). I’m looking to re-image myself because my faculty see me and automatically think “Oh you just want me to teach online!” OR “You demanded I take a survey. Who are you to tell ME what to do?”

What do you suggest? I really want to help my faculty move toward the 21st Century in higher education.

Signed,

Reformation in Progress

Dear Reformation,

Thanks for your question! First of all, I hope you are keeping yourself safe. Even in the best of times, the scenario you present is challenging – yet quite commonly encountered. During the additional challenges posed by the COVID-19 situation, it can be even more difficult to engage faculty in quality online instruction. If ever there was a time to consider yourself as a central figure in your institution, it is now. Instructional designers have been called upon to assist and play a vital role in supporting faculty in teaching remotely. There are a few strategies that can be used to navigate various organizational cultures.

More than ever, instructional designers are central figures for institutional teaching and learning goals.

#1 Ensure that you locate a faculty member who is an advocate for online teaching and learning. Once you do so, make every effort to build a healthy relationship. This will create a way for you to provide needed instructional guidance. Once you find this online champion, you will have access to others who may be interested. Remember, any cultural shift will take time.

#2 I would also recommend that you use the online Faculty Development Decision Guide (FDDG) to assess your organizational needs. Doing so will also provide you with a pathway for developing initiatives for supporting faculty.

#3 Since you have also taught online and have developed various courses, it will be necessary to model/show faculty members the endless possibilities of online teaching and learning. The most significant way to show your skills will be to demonstrate them in practice.

#4 Finally, I would also recommend that you start a series of communication with your faculty members. Your conversation could focus on current practices and research in online teaching and learning, tools, and technologies used in online learning and teaching, and your research. Importantly, I recommend that you consider hosting some informal sessions. These sessions could take the form of one-to-one meetings or group meetings. Your ultimate aim is to build rapport with faculty. Doing so will require time, understanding, support, engagement, and effective communication.

I’m sure there are many more tips that others in the community have found useful. What strategies do you use for effectively engaging faculty in the online course design process – especially during such challenging times as we are currently facing? Please share your thoughts with our community!

Mergers & Acquisitions: Models of Curriculum Design Review (Issue 18)

Dear ADDIE,

I’m an Instructional Designer at a R1 university where our teaching and learning center has recently merged with our Academic Technologies team. As part of this process, I’ve been asked to lead a curriculum review of all the workshops, institutes, and training we offer to our teaching community (this includes faculty, graduate students and post-docs). This is a large task that involves reflecting on what competencies we want them to have, and where there is  overlap or gaps in our offerings. One of the attributes we want to assess is modality and where it might make sense to increase our offerings either fully online or blended. My questions are:

  • What suggestions or recommendations do you have for designing online faculty development courses? Are there specific examples where a self-paced, fully online facilitated or blended might be the best choice?
  • What approaches have others taken to broadly reviewing all their offerings and going through the process of curriculum mapping?

Signed,

Lost in Translation

 

Dear Lost in Translation,

Merging your teaching and learning center with your academic technologies team sounds like an exciting but daunting process. I hope the consolidation of the teams improves the progress toward your common goals as the teams learn to communicate in each other’s design language. As you mentioned, this is a critical time to review your faculty development offerings to ensure your curriculum design develops the intended learning outcomes free of gaps and superfluous overlaps, and aligns across all offerings.

As you review the gaps in your curriculum and select the modalities in which to design and deliver new offerings, consider utilizing a faculty development framework. A recent TOPkit Digest described three top faculty development models for planning new or revamping faculty development programs.

Whichever framework you use to redesign your faculty development program, Curriculum design review assesses learning outcomes, closes gaps, and aligns training with other programs.consider incorporating these three components in your project to strengthen your effectiveness:

  • Survey your stakeholders as early in the redesign process as possible, including your unit personnel, institutional faculty, and even stakeholders external to your institution. This survey will help garner valuable feedback and preferences regarding faculty development in general, your past offerings specifically, and future faculty development offerings. The results of your survey can inform your decisions about modalities, pacing, gaps, etc.
  • Continually align the learning objectives, content, activities, and assessments throughout your redesign. This can help you close gaps and reduce needless overlaps in your offerings and outcomes.
  • Include a timeline in your project planning. This is important for keeping everyone involved in sync and to ensure the redesign actually gets completed. The timeline should include:
    • Tasks to be completed
    • The expected duration of each task
    • The date on which each task needs to be complete
    • Dependencies between tasks

Another resource you may find useful is the Faculty Development Decision Guide (FDDG), an interactive tool designed to allow institutions to evaluate their online faculty development needs, create a plan of action for their own online faculty development program, and have access to resources that will support faculty development. This tool is based on the Quality Transformation Model for Faculty Development (QTMFD).

Whatever the outcome, I hope your unit will share lessons learned and recommendations when your process is complete and your newly formed unit is in operation and progressing toward its objectives.

I’m sure there are many more tips that others in the community have found useful. What strategies do you use for effectively engaging faculty in the online course design process? Please share your thoughts with our community!

Winning Faculty Buy-In for Digital Learning Innovation

For academic leaders looking to build a sustainable, scalable approach to digital learning innovation, getting faculty on board is a critical step. How can you best encourage and support faculty in stepping out of their comfort zones and exploring these new opportunities to improve student success?

In this session, Realizeit CEO Manoj Kulkarni will lead a discussion with Dr. Tom Cavanagh, Vice Provost for Digital Learning at the University of Central Florida, and Dr. J. Garvey Pyke, Director of the Center for Teaching and Learning at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, about the steps they’re taking and what it takes to succeed at this sometimes-challenging task.

Attendees will learn:

• What motivates faculty to explore digitally enhanced teaching
• How to find faculty innovators
• The top objections you’ll hear – and how to overcome them

Online CoLAB Networking Event

This speed networking event connects instructional designers and technology professionals for a fun blast of conversational exchanges! The goals of this event are to:

  • Create a safe and engaging online environment in which participants can meet each other, exchange ideas and build foundations to start conversations and collaborations;
  • Spark collaborations, creativity, innovation and partnerships;
  • Support the participants’ engagement in the TOPkit Community.

Please contact Charlotte Jones-Roberts at Charlotte.Jones-Roberts@ucf.edu for questions or more information.

Register or learn more about the Online CoLAB today!

Team-Based Learning Workshop

We are pleased to announced a new two-day workshop to train educators in Team-Based Learning (TBL). This flipped-classroom style provides many benefits to initiate deep learning and student engagement.

Taught by University of Florida College of Pharmacy and Medicine faculty and TBL experts, the UF TBL Workshop will equip educators with tools to initiate deep learning and strengthen communication skills in the classroom.

The event is June 10-11 in Gainesville and registration is open. Please share with your faculty as an opportunity for advanced training this summer.

What can you expect?

CPE and CME credit options​

For a sneak peek of the workshop, listen to this podcast featuring Dr. Farland.

Revise, Revamp, or Redo Your Online Course

FAU’s Center for eLearning invites you to participate in these free Professional Development sessions. They are offered to all FAU faculty and staff, and all eLearning professionals; you are our eLearning Community of Practice partners! Please join us, and tell a friend.

Headset, microphone, and a quiet area are recommended for optimum virtual participation. CeL tech team will assist with technical questions.

As the semester comes to a close you may be wanting to revise, revamp, or totally redo your online course. This professional development session provides some handy tips.

Participate online via WebEx | Password: spring

 

Or join us at any CeL location. If you have a laptop and/or headset, please bring them. If not, we will do our best to provide them for you.

 

Boca Raton: CeL Training Lab, Building 4, IS-214C

Davie: Liberal Arts Building, LA-203

Jupiter: Student Resources Building, SR-249

 

Center for eLearning

Florida Atlantic University

777 Glades Road, Bldg. 4, Rm 209

Boca Raton, FL 33431

Phone: (561) 297-4850

 

CeL Open Lab Hours:

Boca Raton: IS-208, Mon & Fri 8am-5pm

Broward: LA-203, Mon & Fri 8am-5pm

Jupiter: SR-249, Mon & Fri 8am-5pm

Concept Mapping

FAU’s Center for eLearning invites you to participate in this free Professional Development sessions. They are offered to all FAU faculty and staff, and all eLearning professionals; you are our Community of Practice partners! Please join us, and tell a friend.

In this session, we will discuss the use of concept or mind mapping tools in eLearning. We will also share ways in which mapping tools have contributed to course success and how they can be further utilized in online learning.Con

Participate online via WebEx | Password: spring

Or join us at any CeL location. If you have a laptop and/or headset, please bring them. If not, we will do our best to provide them for you.

  • Boca Raton: CeL Training Lab, Building 4, IS-214
  • Davie: Liberal Arts Building, LA-203
  • Jupiter: Student Resources Building, SR-249

Read & Write Workshop

FAU’s Center for eLearning invites you to participate in this free Professional Development sessions. They are offered to all FAU faculty and staff, and all eLearning professionals; you are our Community of Practice partners! Please join us, and tell a friend.

Read & Write’s powerful literacy software is free for everyone at FAU. This interactive workshop continues the larger discussion of accessibility in online courses and ways to help faculty, staff, and students soar in their academics.

Headset, microphone, and a quiet area are recommended for optimum virtual participation. CeL tech team will assist with technical questions.

Participate online via WebEx | Password: spring

Or join us at any CeL location. If you have a laptop and/or headset, please bring them. If not, we will do our best to provide them for you.

  • Boca Raton: CeL Training Lab, Building 4, IS-214
  • Davie: Liberal Arts Building, LA-203
  • Jupiter: Student Resources Building, SR-249

Rubrics: Putting Online Students in the Driver’s Seat

Description:In this session, we will discuss how faculty can use rubrics as tools for instruction and self-directed learning in online learning environments.

As always, these sessions are open to all FAU faculty, staff, and our eLearning Community of Practice partners. Please share the information below!

Participate online via WebEx | Password: spring

A quiet area, headset, and microphone are recommended for optimal virtual participation. The CeL team will help with technical questions.

Or join us at any CeL location. If you have a laptop and/or headset, please bring them. If not, we will do our best to provide them for you.

  • Boca Raton: CeL Training Lab, Building 4, Room IS-214
  • Davie: Liberal Arts Building, Room LA-203
  • Jupiter: Student Resources Building, Room SR-249